Q for new setup with gb input. Architecture and backhaul


  • I just moved into a new house. It’s an older home that was renovated. But the renovation did not include Ethernet. It’s three floors plus basement with FiOS, in the basement, of course.

    Having someone come in and run wires would cost a fortune, but I’m pretty sure I can run a line from the basement to my office on the second floor.

    Right now I have the kit setup with the router in the basement and the mesh points on floors 1 and 2. The connection is insufficient, which isn’t surprising. I think setting up a backhaul and wiring my office computer on directly will provide near full possible speed throughout the house. I know the WiFi won’t actually allow the full gb connection, but I want Netflix running with bandwidth to spare and the console to run updates at reasonable speed.

    First question: is that right, or am I missing something important here? I’m trying to avoid running Ethernet everywhere right now, but I want sufficient WiFi speed for multiple streaming and gaming devices. Will the backhaul plus router do it?

    Second question: I think both the router and backhaul should be separated but within connection distance of each other. Is there an ideal range I should look for? I know it will vary by construction, but is 20 feet too close? How does the floor impact that calculation?

    Third question: should I connect these in series or parallel? Would running the line from the Verizon box to the router to the second router and then to my computer do the trick? Or should I set up a switch somewhere in here? Before or after the first router? If I do set them up in series, which router should be configured as the backbone? The first or second one from the Verizon box? Does it matter?

    Thank guys, any advice here will save hours of cursing.


  • @benjamin-shender said in Q for new setup with gb input. Architecture and backhaul:

    First question: is that right, or am I missing something important here? I’m trying to avoid running Ethernet everywhere right now, but I want sufficient WiFi speed for multiple streaming and gaming devices. Will the backhaul plus router do it?

    You're correct, if you were to run an ethernet line to the second floor, you can add an AFI-R and enable ethernet backhaul which would give you better performance and coverage on the upper levels of your home, and reduce the amount of hops when using the mesh points.

    Second question: I think both the router and backhaul should be separated but within connection distance of each other. Is there an ideal range I should look for? I know it will vary by construction, but is 20 feet too close? How does the floor impact that calculation?

    All building material and environments are different so its hard to say without trial and error. 20 ft is fairly close, but 20 ft vertically through two floors might not be a bad distance. What I would do is stand in the office where you are thinking about placing the second AFI-R, unplug the mesh points so you only have the signal from the router broadcasting and use the app to see what your connection strength is. If it's weak, then thats going to be an ideal spot. If its very strong, try to find a location thats a little further.

    Third question: should I connect these in series or parallel? Would running the line from the Verizon box to the router to the second router and then to my computer do the trick? Or should I set up a switch somewhere in here? Before or after the first router? If I do set them up in series, which router should be configured as the backbone? The first or second one from the Verizon box? Does it matter?

    Assuming your Verizon box is in bridge mode, you want it configured like: Verizon>Primary AmpliFi(basement)> Second AFI-R in mesh mode w/ Ethernet backhaul enabled.

    Where you place the switch does not matter. Except, the only thing that should be hardwired to your Verizon box is the main AmpliFi unit. Most modem/router combos disable all LAN ports except LAN1 for this reason, that it shouldn't have anything connect besides the new router.


  • @ubnt-brett

    I paused both mesh points and the signal on my devices in the office dropped to about 60% and fell to the 2.4 GHz band.

    So, did I overdo this? The office is roughly in the middle of the living areas, if I run a single ethernet line to a single router to my office and plug my computer in directly, I should have the gigabit connection on the computer and reasonable or better wifi everywhere else even without the mesh points, right? Does a backhaul even make sense in this context? It only improves the wifi by reducing hops between the endpoints, right? Nothing more than that?


  • @benjamin-shender If you dropped to a 60% on 2.4 then the location you tested is the perfect spot for a hardwired RAMP (Router as a mesh point). You would want the ethernet backhaul to provide you full gig speeds to your hardwired computer, and because you essentially have replicated the primary routers strength in the middle of your home, your wireless coverage throughout will be greatly improved.

    It improves wifi by reducing hops, and giving all wireless devices two full strength locations to connect too. The best case scenario in all environment would be to use 100% hardwired AmpliFi routers. however for most, running cables is not an option so using wireless mesh points is the next best thing. Since you can run an ethernet line to your office, you should. And i'm certain that other community members would agree.

    With 60% on 2.4, I can only imagine that the performance on your top level is dismal at best. With the hardwired backhaul unit, you can now use the mesh points to simply fill any last dead spots your home may have.


  • @ubnt-brett Okay.

    So I run the ethernet from my FiOS box to the main HD router (kit). And then from that router up to the RAMP configured HD unit in my office, plugging my work computer into that. After that I can walk around the house and see if a mesh unit is necessary up stairs or not. Is that my plan?

    From what I read, there shouldn't be any issues with one HD being a kit so long as it is the primary router and the other RAMP configured HD unit was purchased as an independent, right?

    When I do this, should I / do I need to do a full factory reset and setup it up like my first time, or will it adapt to the new configuration dynamically as things are plugged-in and unplugged?


  • @benjamin-shender

    After that I can walk around the house and see if a mesh unit is necessary up stairs or not. Is that my plan?

    Correct!

    there shouldn't be any issues with one HD being a kit so long as it is the primary router and the other RAMP configured HD unit was purchased as an independent, right?

    Also correct!

    do I need to do a full factory reset and setup it up like my first time

    No, you can leave everything the way it is. Introduce the new AmpliFi router by plugging it into power only, and adding it as a wireless mesh point. I recommend doing this in the same room as the primary router because it is detected by the network via bluetooth. Then once you have added the router as a mesh point, toggle on the 'Ethernet Backhaul' setting and relocate to your office.


  • @ubnt-brett

    No, you can leave everything the way it is. Introduce the new AmpliFi router by plugging it into power only, and adding it as a wireless mesh point. I recommend doing this in the same room as the primary router because it is detected by the network via bluetooth. Then once you have added the router as a mesh point, toggle on the 'Ethernet Backhaul' setting and relocate to your office.

    Okay, connect via ethernet down there too, and then move it, or just tell it that it will be an ethernet backhaul and then move it and plug it in?


  • @benjamin-shender Connect it downstairs wirelessly first. Don't connect an ethernet cable until you have toggled on Ethernet Backhaul and moved it upstairs.


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