Would one Alien Work?


  • Would one Alien work in a 3,000 square foot house? The house is a single story and has dry wall. Normally other routers I own like theTP Link Archer C9 would give a weak signal in the front living room when the router is placed near the back of the house or should I go with two Aliens?


  • @Sean-Kilbane One Alien may work for your setup, but more than just physical aspects can impact wireless signal and performance. Also, the location of the Alien router may help provide full coverage in your environment. Do you have a centralized point where the ISP signal is coming in or are you restricted to an external wall for placement?

    I suggest starting with one unit and adding as needed.


  • @UI-AmpliFi External wall is where the it would be near the backend of the house.


  • @Sean-Kilbane With the Alien antenna being omni directional, you cannot direct it towards the interior of your house vs the external wall. This is not as ideal as a central location, however one still may cover your 3,000 sq. ft. house.


  • @UI-AmpliFi Thanks!


  • @UI-AmpliFi said in Would one Alien Work?:

    One Alien may work for your setup, but more than just physical aspects can impact wireless signal and performance.

    One Alien seems to be working well for us (about 3 days' experience so far), but we're here temporarily, waiting for our home in Northern CA to be rebuilt after the devastating Santa Rosa (Sonoma County) wildfires of October 2017. By working well, I mean that my OOKLA speedtest.net tests from my upstairs laptop, about 40 feet (relatively unobstructed) from the Router hover right about 400 mbps DL, 24 mbps UL, which is what I'm paying Spectrum for, and sitting 10 feet from the router in the same room, I get 440 mbps DL with an 8-10 ms PING to the server, which is about 40 miles away.

    For many reasons (scarcity of wooden framing, possible superiority of steel framing for fire resistance) all the houses in our neighborhood are being rebuilt with steel framing and steel roofs.

    We don't know yet whether we'll return to CA. First choice is to sell the house. But, IF we go back, will the steel framing cause troubles. The framing elements are metal (studs, floor supports, roof joists), and the roofs themselves, which are wired for solar.

    The interior walls are conventional drywall, and the exterior sheer walls are fire-resistant laminated wood. The siding is stucco, and I believe the stucco was applied to metal mesh, but we're in Montana and didn't see that part of the construction.

    Do you think 16" spaced metal studs would compromise WiFi signals within the house?

    The other question is whether in this scenario, purchasing a second AmpliFi alien and configuring it to be a MESH point for clustered devices on the second floor would yield decent upstairs Ethernet using the MESH point's 4 gigabit LAN ports.

    One of the reasons I didn't purchase the paired router/MESH point bundle was because of the single gigabit EN port on the dedicated MESH point. Was there some design reason for not having 4 LAN ports on the MESH unit?


  • @jsrnephdoc said in Would one Alien Work?:

    We don't know yet whether we'll return to CA. First choice is to sell the house. But, IF we go back, will the steel framing cause troubles.

    I should have mentioned that we will have star topology Cat 6 EN available all over the house, so I'm not overly concerned about the framing, although IF we move in rather than sell, one of the first things we'll do in the new house is replace the ridiculous one-word-vocabulary "chirp" smoke detectors with Nest's smart "Nest Protect" smoke and CO detectors that talk to you and send you spoken SMS messages and emails if something goes wrong in the house.

    Some of Nest's smart home stuff communicates with the central WiFi connected security host over proprietary wireless signals (I don't know what wavelength they use). I've never read about problems with those peripheral sensors (movement, window/door, under-carpet pad) communicating to the Nest Guard or newer Google-Nest Hub based on the size of the house or the wall construction. Does anyone here have a clue about that?


  • @jsrnephdoc Metal is certainly not a great media for RF to pass through, there may be a shadowing effect and speed losses where the studs are. I would think that if they are spaced far enough apart the Alien will be able to work ok. Perhaps there is another user that lives in a similar environment?


  • @Sean-Kilbane I have a 3,000sq foot house and 1 unit. No issues. I even have coverage around the pool and out front.


  • @Timothy-Farley Where is your router located?


  • @Sean-Kilbane Upstairs middle of house.


  • @Timothy-Farley That's my problem. I have to have it near the backend of the house near tht side of the house. So two Aliens would be better for my setup.


  • @Sean-Kilbane I had it originally in a different spot, not ideal for the first few months. It was down stairs and on the far side. Still one was enough.


  • @Timothy-Farley I might give it a go and see. Thanks!


  • @Sean-Kilbane I honestly am extremely happy with it. Worth ever penny.


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